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Rocket Engines

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11D-513
11D-57
11D-58
Aerospike
Aestus
HM7B
LE-5
LE-7
MA-5
NK-31 / 39
NK-33 / 43
RD-120
RD-170
RD-180
RL-10
RL-60
RS-27
RS-68
RS-72
RS-76
SSME
Viking
Vulcain

   11D-58 - Summary
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The 11D-58 engine was developed to propel the Block-D as part of an N-1 moon program.  Russia's original N-1 moon vehicle used the Block-G to propel the lunar lander out of LEO and on a trans-lunar trajectory.  The Block-D, which uses a similar configuration, was developed to initially place the lunar orbiter / lander into a lunar orbit and then decelerate it out onto its landing trajectory.  The Block-D was also designed to be compatible with the Proton launch vehicle - allowing smaller probes and manned vehicles to be sent to the moon.  The Block-D was used as part of Russia's successful lunar sample return mission.

In the years that followed the race to the moon, the 11D-58 and the Block-D were critical to Russia's planetary exploration program.   In the mid-1980's the 11D-58S was developed to serve as both the Buran OMS engines and to power the upgraded Block-DM.  The new 11D-58S uses a synthetic kerosene known as "syntin" to increase the engine Isp from 353 to 361 seconds.  Today, the 11D-58S and the Block-DM are used to serve the commercial GTO market as the third stage of   SeaLaunch (Zenit 3SL) and the fourth stage of the ILS Proton D-1-e.

Prime Contractor: NPO Energomash
Point of Contact  
Web Links: 11D-58 on Mark Wade's Encylopedia Astronautica

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