logo_db.gif (1248 bytes)
button1off.gif (600 bytes)button2off.gif (568 bytes)button3off.gif (465 bytes)button4off.gif (442 bytes)

Expendable LV's

button5off.gif (444 bytes)button6off.gif (559 bytes)button7off.gif (454 bytes)button8off.gif (413 bytes)button9off.gif (470 bytes)

Angara
Ariane 4
Ariane 5
Athena
Atlas II
Atlas III
Atlas V
Avrora (Aurora)
Beal BA-2
Delta II
Delta III
Delta IV
Dnepr
Eurockot
GSLV
H-IIA
J-1
Kosmos 3M
Long March 3
Pegasus
Proton
Shtil
Soyuz
Start
Strela
Taurus
Titan II
Titan IV
Tsiklon
Zenit

   H-IIA - Summary
space.gif (43 bytes)

h2a_config.gif (27966 bytes)The H-IIA vehicle is an upgraded version of the H-II currently in service.  The H-IIA is intended to compete comercially on the world market.  In 1997, Hughes signed a contract for 10 H-IIA launches valued at approximately US$1 billion.  The H-IIA builds upon it's predecessor and incorporates a simplified design and manufacturing process as well as upgraded avionics and engines (LE-7A and LE-5B).  Although the core vehicle is very similar to the H-II, the new H-IIA uses new solid and liquid boosters to significantly improve payload performance.

NASDA Logo.gif (5594 bytes)

The H-IIA comes in five variants.  The basic H2A202 configuration uses a core vehicle with two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB-A's) to place four metric tons into a 28.5 degree GTO orbit.  The H2A2022 and H2A2024 configurations add two and four Solid Strap-On Boosters (SSB's) respectively to increase GTO performance up to 4.5 metric tons.  Adding Liquid Strap-On Boosters (LRB's) to the basic H2A202 configuration creates the H2A212 (one LRB) and H2A222 (two LRB's) configurations which are capable of placing 7.5 and 9.5 metric tons into a GTO orbit.

h2a_h2afamily_s.gif (14474 bytes)

Prime Contractor: National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA)
Point of Contact NASDA Office of Space Transportation System
Hamamatsu-cho World Trade Center Building 26F
2-4-1 Hamamatsu-cho, Minato-ku Tokyo, 108-8060 Japan
Tel:  + 81.3.3438.6465
Fax: + 81.3.5402.6527
Launch Site: Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
(30.2 deg. N Latitude)
Web Links: H-IIA Web Site

Copyright 2001 - Andrews Space & Technology
Andrews Space & Technology Privacy Statement